Views of "Ocean Park"...


The "Casino" was located on the Southwest corner of Ocean Avenue and South Broadway.


This shows the Casino in the back ground with buildings on South Broadway.  
Compare the image above with that of the black and white below.  
Note how the people are facing. These two photos were taken within a minute of each other and I was able to find them both.

 


This building is "The Casino" which stood on the corner of Old Ocean Avenue and South Broadway.


Another view of the Casino and gazebos from the boardwalk to where the Ocean Place conference center is currently located.


The "New Casino" located where the Ocean Place Conference Center currently stands. Dated August 24th, 1908.


This is an aerial view of the block boarded by South Broadway, Laird Street, Abbotsford Avenue and the original Ocean Avenue.





This is the steamboat "Thomas Patten" passing through the old swing bridge over the Shrewsbury River.

 

 


This peaceful view of boats on the water was near where the Atlantic Avenue bridge is today.



This is a view of Myrtle Avenue looking north from Broadway. Dated July 9th, 1908.


This is the Chelsea Pool, "The largest on the Jersey Coast."

 

 


This is Chelsea Avenue looking southwest.


The Johnson's Club located on the corner of Ocean Avenue and Brighton Avenue viewed from where the video store is located today. 

 

 
This was a candy store?  Our banks and government buildings are nowhere near this ornate today.

 

The Third Avenue Post Office.

 

 


Portions of the walls to this great estate still exist on the east and west side of Ocean Boulevard just south of Bath Avenue where they are currently building a new townhouse project. Ornate sections also still exist in the back yards of small brick homes on Second Avenue south of Bath Avenue. 

 


This section of the Hearn Estate wall still exists behind the brick homes on Second Avenue just south of Bath Avenue.  Go by and take a look.



The "Pond Top" estate once owned by Dr. Ciampa on Morris Avenue.  Now the site of a townhouse project under construction.

 


The USO on Garfield Avenue, later to be the Elks Lodge.


Chelsea Avenue looking east from Third Avenue dated October 20th, 1905.


This is a photograph postcard of the Lyceum, located on the northeast corner of Chelsea Avenue and Third Avenue.



A view of an un-muttled original Star of the Sea School circa 1890.

 

 


Looking south at the intersection of Third and Westwood Avenues from Chelsea Avenue.

 


The "Congragational Church."

 


The "Elberon Church."


The Southeast corner of Chelsea and Third Avenue.


This is the original Star of the Sea church on the northwest corner of Chelsea Avenue and Second Avenue.


Chelsea and Second Avenues looking north. To the left is the original frame Star of the Sea Church.
Depicted in greater detail below is the original Shul farther down Second Avenue on the right. 

 


 The Shul on the east side of Second Avenue near the intersection of Garfield Avenue.


This is the intersection of Chelsea Avenue and Second Avenue looking east showing the train tracks where Ocean Blvd is located today.


This is the original train station on Third Avenue.

 


The train station located just north of Atlantic Avenue on a site where Ocean Blvd is today.


Atlantic Avenue looking southwest just east of the railroad, where Ocean Boulevard is today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Chattle High School and Middle School.

 

 

 


"Merrick's Lunch" at 267 Morris.  Eddy Bruno is the child behind the mound of snow!

 

 


This is the intersection of Bath and Westwood Avenues looking northwest.

 


The Club "San Remo" later to be know as "Yvonne's Rapsody in Blue" on West End and Old Ocean Avenues.

 


This was where the Fine Fare super market is today on Third Avenue.

 



This was a roller coaster located on the casino lot just east of Abbottsford Avenue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music credit: "Pine Apple Rag", Scott Joplin, Composer


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